“Los vestidos desarrgados” — Alberto Iglesias

2 04 2012

Working in a theatre has allowed me to watch the credits of all the films that screen at our little theatre.  I may not have any time to watch the actual movies themselves, but I can tell you exactly what happens during the end credits, knowledge which is by and large useless (unless there’s a scene at the end and I can spoil it for someone, which is always fun).  Cleaning up to the credits of The Skin I Live In was really cool because I actually got to listen to intense, fantastic music of Alberto Iglesias, who wrote the score for the film.  I love how frantic and dramatic it is, which fits perfectly with the tone and plot of the film (I did manage to see this one, albeit at a second-run theatre after it had exited our cinema).  It’s interesting that Iglesias’s score for Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy was nominated for an Oscar and not this one.  I do think Tinker Tailor was much more subtle, as the film itself is quite an engrossing, quiet film, but man, sometimes it’s just fantastic to hear something so dramatic and exciting as this one.  And all played by strings too.





Busy busy

1 10 2011

Writing 25 consecutive minutes of piano music for a friend’s film + preparing for a show tonight + dealing with short story publications + organizing production meetings for my next shrot film + lots of schoolwork + work =

Crazy.





“The King’s Speech” — Alexandre Desplat (from The King’s Speech soundtrack)

27 02 2011

Well, I don’t know what to write about tonight and though I could easily spew something random and post it under Random stuff, I’ll push myself to instead write about The King’s Speech instead, since the Oscars were tonight and all.

Alright, so Alexandre Desplat may have lost out to Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross for The Social Network (I can’t criticize that decision since I haven’t seen the film nor have heard the score) but that doesn’t mean he did a bad job with TKS.  I’ve posted the main theme from the film, of the same title.  I like the simplicity of the production and the instrumentation that Desplat is so very skilled at doing.  In just under 4 minutes, I feel like he encapuslates the entire emotion, the experience of the film: from the opening, hopeful melody changing into more dramatic, then into the minor key, if you haven’t seen the film before, it’s a good preview of what to expect.

After watching clips of The King’s Speech at the Oscars and hearing the score, I want to see the movie again!  But alas, the confines of school and my so-called life prevent me from venturing out to the theatres.  Guess I’ll just have to listen to the soundtrack on repeat, and continue to want to see the film again until I implode.